Product Review: The Rod Glove (Ice Series)

Product Review: The Rod Glove (Ice Series)

Date:  03/21/16
Product type: Ice Fishing Rod Glove
Manufacturer: The Rod Glove
Reviewer: Kirsti Harris

 

Protect your Rods!! The Rod Glove.

Protect your Rods!! The Rod Glove.

 

 

 

Introduction:

I love using The Rod Glove for all seasons. I do a lot of hiking into backwoods lakes so it is important for me to keep my rod covered and protected. It saves me money in the long run from having to purchase new eyelets or a new rod from being damaged from all the sticks and brush I encounter. The durable stretchy neoprene material is great protection and allows me to easily pack away, or unpack.

 

 

 

The Rod Glove Specifications
Type  Ice Fishing Rod Glove
Length 23″
Weight  
Material Strecthy neoprene
Hooks N/A
Colors Black
Origin The Rod Glove
MSRP $4.49

 

 

Quality/Construction:

The Rod Glove has a very durable and stretch neoprene material that helps ensure my rods are protected. You are able to choose which colour you prefer and also the length of the glove that best suits your needs.

Kirsti is always sure to keep her ice rods covered and protected during travel. Her Rod Gloves keep her rods safe!

Kirsti is always sure to keep her ice rods covered and protected during travel. Her Rod Gloves keep her rods safe!

 

Quality Ratings for The Rod Glove
Finish(1-5) Level of Detail(1-5) Hardware(1-5) Craftsmanship(1-5) Total Possible Rating (10 being highest )
5 5 5 5 20 20 10

 

 

Performance:

The performance of the Rod Glove exceeded its expectations. Its easily able to slip on and off quickly to set up or having to pack away. It leaves a no mess tangle for my multiple rods in my case and has a durable stretchy neoprene material to help keep them protected.

 

 

Performance Ratings The Rod Glove
Castability(1-5) Ease of Use(1-5) Quality of Action (1-5) Position at Rest (1-5) Durability (1-5) Total Possible Rating (10 being highest )
5 5 5 5 5 25 25 10

 

Features/Design:

Not only does The Rod Glove come in various colours but different sizes as well to meet your needs and wants. It is a stretchable neoprene material with a perfect diameter that is able to easily slip on or off of your rod.

 

Feature /Design Ratings The Rod Glove
  Consistency(1-5) Weight(1-5) Realism (1-5) Range of sizes (1-3) Total Possible Rating (10 being highest )
5 5 5 3 13 13 10

 

 

Application:

I’ve had the chance to field test The Rod Glove out in the bush hiking through thick trails and it sure does the job perfectly. It keeps my rod’s protected and the cover is easily able to be removed once I reach my destination.

 

The Rod Glove Collective Final Rating
Construction/Quality   10
Performance   10
Price   10
Features   10
Design (Ergonomics)   10
Application   10
Total Score 60
Ratings Key: 1 = terrible : 2 = poor : 3 = lacking : 4 = sub par : 5 = mediocre : 6 = fair : 7 = good : 8 = great : 9 = excellent : 10 = MUST HAVE  

 

Conclusion: Overall The Rod Glove has great quality features that perform very well in all seasons of fishing. You’ll never see me hiking into another backwoods lake without my Rod Glove for protection.

 

Kirsti Harris- Exist To Fish Canada Writer

Kirsti Harris- Exist To Fish Canada Writer

Pounding For Perch

Pounding For Perch

Justin Girard-Exist To Fish Canada Writer with a pair of nice perch!

Justin Girard-Exist To Fish Canada Writer with a pair of nice perch!

Pounding for Perch

Jumbo perch can be a very challenging, yet rewarding fish species to target during the cold winter months. Not only are they a blast to catch, keeping you entertained for hours, but they make for a tasty meal at the end of a long hard day on the ice. Keeping things simple is the key to enjoying a bent rod and a delicious shore lunch.

 

Where to start is always the challenge. I always like to hit my “usual” marked GPS spots but even I get caught up in over thinking perch and their habits. During the early winter months, I will begin by targeting depths of around 10-15 feet in areas that have an abundance of aquatic plant life. Perch love hanging around weeds during the early winter months because they produce small organisms that they tend to feed on, like nymphs or freshwater shrimp. If you find plant life, you will typically find some feisty perch.

 

Colin Booth with a handful of Perch!

Colin Booth with a handful of Perch!

Exist To Fish Canada team member and Lake Simcoe local Colin Booth has a similar take on prospecting for perch. He explains “I look for weed/sand transitions. I like to sight fish when perch are holding in shallow water (10-15ft deep) which is like picking through the bad apples to find the one you want” He continues “As they pull into deeper water, a good sonar is key to locating schools on prime locations”.

 

As the winter season progresses and fishing pressure increases, I typically move to deeper sand flats, in and around the 30 to 40ft depth range. The key when fishing the deeper areas is to move around or “run and gun” with the goal of being a step ahead of the schools. I will give it around 20 minutes of pounding bottom, then, if I don’t see any activity on my sonar I will make a move to another area. When moving around in the deeper areas, I usually don’t move too far to find the school, at times only moving 50 to 100 yards at a time.

 

 

Tactics & Lure Selection

 

Perch Pounder Rig

Perch Pounder Rig

I mentioned earlier about pounding bottom, as this method has been key to my success out there, especially during those slower days. This technique of “pounding” entails tying a heavy weight and an old spoon onto to 50 pound braided line. Have I gone crazy? Not yet, just bear with me. When I get to a typical high percentage spot and the sonar is blank, I put my “perch pounder” down and Perch1you guessed it, I pound the bottom with it. This will create a cloud of sand and vivid vibrations through the water which will catch the attention of every fish in the general vicinity. Let’s face it, when you are laying on the couch, watching TV and you hear a loud noise outside of your house what do you do? You get up and try to find out where that noise came from and fish are no different, especially perch.

Keep in mind, you can make one of these “perch pounder” rigs with whatever you have available, there is no right or wrong way to make a perch pounder. The key is to ultimately get their attention thus calling them into the real estate below your feet.

 

Once I get their attention, it’s game on. This is when I show them my go-to presentation which is a drop shot rig, but instead of having the weight on the bottom, I use a small spoon like a slab grabber or buckshot spoon as the weight. And about 15 inches above that, a small hook with a bait of choice such as live minnows, maggots, small plastics or anything that matches a particular lakes forage.

 

Colin Booth has a very similar take on this. “I’ll use a flashy spoon to call them in, and when they show up I will work through my tackle box and try to nail down the right presentation. Small spoons, plastics or jigging style baits all have a time and place”.

 

Here’s a neat little trick Jamie Wilson (Exist To Fish lead writer) spoke of for live bait, particularly minnows. “If a treble hooked spoon or jigging style bait is your thing, try replacing the split ring with a tiny snap swivel. Then simply thread the head of the minnow onto the hook shank, snap the hook back into place and voila, you have a long lasting live bait rig”.

Exist To Fish Canada team member, and professional guide Aaron Jolicoeur subscribes to the idea of heavier weighted presentations for perch. He explains “Heavy-weighted baits are crucial as it

Aaron Jolicouer with a pair of JUMBOS!!

Aaron Jolicouer with a pair of JUMBOS!!

gives you the ability to quickly drop down to fish roaming below”. He continues “sonar with good target separation helps you to target the bigger perch in the school. Also, the more fish you keep under the hole, the better as this will attract numbers of larger, territorially competitive fish”.

 

An ultra-light spinning combo spooled with 6 pound braided line coupled with a 4 pound fluorocarbon leader will always get the job done. This set-up will have the sensitivity and feel to detect the lightest of bites which is very important. When using soft plastics, scent provides a distinct advantage through the realism of a scent trail and a blast of taste and the perception of a slime coat. Liquid Mayhem “Garlic Minnow” gets top honors here for sure as fish seem to hold on longer and often just try to swallow the bait whole.

So no matter where you are in this great white north that we live in, go pounding for some perch. Dial in the right presentation and have a blast putting some juicy jumbo perch topside.

Have fun and play it safe on the ice everybody!

Justin Girard-Exist To Fish Canada Writer

Justin Girard-Exist To Fish Canada Writer

Lead Writer/Editor Jamie Wilson

Lead Writer/Editor Jamie Wilson

 
Lake Life with Kirsti Harris: A Day of Perchin’ on Lake Superior

Lake Life with Kirsti Harris: A Day of Perchin’ on Lake Superior

Kirsti Harris- Exist To Fish Canada Writer

Kirsti Harris- Exist To Fish Canada Writer

If you can hook into an active school of perch, you’re bound to have a blast out on the ice all day long. Perch are some of the milder tasting fish, along with crappie and bluegill. Hooked from the ice cold waters, you’ll find their flesh looking white while being a yummy, fresh, healthy meal to bring home. In most fishing zones, the limits are usually quite generous.

On this particular day we set out to one of the bays on the north western shores of Lake Superior. We left at 7:30am with an hour’s drive ahead of us. It was a cold morning, with temperatures dipping to -30C by the time we arrived. Luckily, clear sunny skies were upon us and temperatures were forecasted to rise by noon. The winds were only 1km/h North East, which made the 9km sled ride out to the spot bearable.

We were right out in the open, about 1.5kms away from an island. We rented a shack and also had a pop up hut along with us, as we were a group of six. We talked to the local owner of the ice shacks and had asked how the fishing has been, what has been working, etc. If you have the opportunity to ask the locals in the area for tips and information, do so as it`s a great way to gain knowledge to better prepare you for what techniques to use.

We began drilling the holes in the open bottom ice shack, and then drilled some holes outside to figure out where the pop up would go. Using our portable Lowrance sonar/fish finder, we found a ten foot hump that was holding a few fish on bottom. By 10:00am all of our lines were finally in. We Kirst's Hutset up just ten to fifteen feet away from the ice shack. The depth of the water was about thirty feet in the shacks and our rods outside were in the twenty to twenty five foot range in the water column. Perch are known to hold in anywhere from three to eighty feet deep. That seems like a big jump, but in the larger great lakes you can find them in the deeper waters as there is a larger space and water capacity (whereas in smaller inland lakes sometimes they are as shallow as three feet deep but on average they’re typically in the twenty to thirty foot range). Today we had rods set up all in the twenty to thirty foot range so we could determine where the action would be.

Perch are usually found on soft bottoms along reefs, or slow-tapering drop offs near weed lines. Your best bet is to work any points, flats, and bars. This may mean drilling dozens of holes, especially if you are new to the spot/area and are unsure of exactly what structure lies beneath. Always keep in mind that every lake is different and you might have to change up your techniques to suit the given situation and conditions.

For perch, people typically like to use a lighter action rod, but for myself I prefer a medium light rod. This setup still has backbone on the lower end to help with hooksets and consistent line tension while having the lighter sensitive tip which enables you to feel those subtle bites.  Perch are known to suck in the bait only to then spit it back out, so once you feel them starting to nibble your bait, it`s time to set the hook.

On this day we were using the classic 1/8oz jig and minnow combination. Colors that were attracting them were blues and greens. Other common lures used are Buckshot Spoons, Swedish Pimples, Kirstis drilling a holeRapala`s Jigging Shad Rap, and small Tubes, just to name a few. Liquid Mayhem attractant is always a welcome addition as well .Many anglers will use maggots, minnows, worms, or other live grub as tippers. I recommend using a fluorocarbon ice line that is anywhere between a three to six pound test line depending on the size of perch in the area you`re targeting. Keep in mind that fluorocarbon line is a lot more sensitive than monofilament lines. Also

Kirsti is always sure to keep her ice rods covered and protected during travel. Her Rod Gloves keep her rods safe!

Kirsti is always sure to keep her ice rods covered and protected during travel. Her Rod Gloves keep her rods safe!

something to note is that some people prefer the zero stretch properties of braided line. It is good to have a few rod/reel combinations along with you to adjust your techniques to that which will be most successful. Also, making sure your lure is the proper weight so it is getting down to the right depth, while maintaining the right amount of line tension so you can feel those little bites, is key.

On this particular outing we had about a dozen perch on the ice by noon. Most of the perch were being caught in the thirty foot range in the ice shacks rather than the rods set up outside in the twenty to twenty five foot range. The most successful presentation was jigging lightly, pausing every so often and then lifting our lines up about a foot and dropping it back down and repeating. A lot of success also came from the rods just sitting still/dead sticking in the rod holders, simply letting the minnow kick around and do the work.

When we would mark a fish on the sonar, we would lift/reel the jig to just right above the fish, lightly jigging then pausing the bait to spark the fish’s interest. Then we would start slowly reeling in the line while still continuing the jigging and pausing technique to keep them interested, and if the fish continued to follow the bait up the water column there was a good chance of the fish striking. It is important to try out different jigging sequences/cadences to figure out what the perch like, which can be tricky, and is a trial and error process.

 

By the end of the day we had iced twenty four perch. We had most of our hits in the morning with the activity dying down throughout the day, then picking back up in the early evening. It was a successful day out on the ice and we were all bringing home a healthy fresh meal for supper. The sun was just setting at 6:00pm and the temperatures were just starting to drop again.

The perch bite is slower in the month of February whereas December and January are usually great months for perch fishing (late winter/late ice also is a great time). Something to note, because perch are schooling fish, when you hook into one, usually there are plenty more to come. Sometimes they can be finicky though, and you can go a whole day only catching five to ten, whereas other days you can catch upwards of forty or even sixty. All around it’s beautiful to just get out, catch some fish and get some fresh clean air. It’s always a learning experience, and it`s always an adventure in Northern Ontario.

 

 

Jamie Wilson. Exist To Fish Canada Lead Writer/Editor

Jamie Wilson. Exist To Fish Canada Lead Writer/Editor

Kirsti Harris

Written By Kirsti Harris- Exist To Fish Canada Writer

 

 

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